The most arduous car race on the planet

The Indianapolis 500 arduous race is a symbol of skill, taking place among the world’s leading car experts.


The annual motorsport race, nicknamed “Indianapolis 500”, is often referred to as the “Indy 500” with a length of exactly 500 miles (805km) over 200 laps, held annually at the dedicated shaped race. Oval Motor Speedway (IMS), located in the town of Wayne, just outside the city of Indianapolis (Indiana, USA), is obviously the toughest fixed-race car track in the world, always requiring drivers brave guts …

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These 500 miles of long journey are not difficult for professional manufacturers who design cutting-edge sports racing cars with the help of the latest computers, then proceed. Tested in specialized aerodynamic systems before delivery. The Indianapolis 500 arduous race is a symbol of skill, taking place among the world’s leading car experts.

This is the most famous race track in the US, although it is not the fastest race, as well as requires the highest professional skill. The continuous left-turning cycle of the track obliges the athletes to press the gas continuously and to slow down at the right moment of cornering so that the high-capacity engines have the opportunity to “relax” – one of the most crucial things to make a technical victory.

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Since 1911, when Indy 500 was held in Indianapolis for the first time so far (only interrupted during 2 World Wars), accident statistics have increased steadily: 14 athletes died on the track, only 21 others while practicing or testing cars. The accident also claimed the lives of 30 technical staff and the audience (the most recent person killed by a tire hit by the tire).

Only the process of training and improving the preparation skills for the race had 25 cases of accidents, 23 drivers and a concrete eel separated the race from the audience. Traditionally, athletes who have had an accident in Indianapolis often show up in wheelchairs in the honor block in the IMS main bleachers.

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Causes of accidents in Indy 500 include two reasons: First to not lose speed when cornering, riders often “glide” close to the wall – the concrete eel protects only a few centimeters. Secondly, in an attempt to regain the vanguard during the start, many inexperienced riders were turned over in the first bend.

Many new measures have been applied to limit the number of deaths and casualties, such as limiting engine volume, for athletes to wear special costumes that are difficult to build and do not catch fire, and install automatic systems. interrupting fuel when an incident occurs…